2014 Top Employer
doctorbuttonrest
locationbuttonrest
classbuttonrest
foundationbuttonrest
Medical Imaging Services

Kennedy offers a full range of diagnostic imaging services using all state-of-the-art equipment at its three hospital campuses and Outpatient Medical Imaging Center.

Whether it's an advanced test - like a helical CAT scan - or a more routine test, such as a mammogram, our staff provides each patient with the finest in medical imaging technology and personalized care. Even if your test is considered routine, you'll find the care you receive at Kennedy is anything but! The things that are important to you as a patient are just as important to us.

Kennedy's team of skilled healthcare professionals provide patients with the information needed to understand and feel comfortable with the tests they're undergoing. At Kennedy, your questions will not go unanswered. Here your comfort and well-being comes first.

It is important to have Medical Imaging studies done in a timely matter. We offer convenient hours, and test results are sent out immediately. We are conveniently located in Cherry Hill, Stratford, and Washington Township, NJ. Our practice is a preferred provider for most insurance carriers and HMOs.


Radiology - Medical Imaging
2201 Chapel Avenue West
Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
Appointments Only: 844-547-2255 Questions: 856-488-6844

Directions
 

Radiology - Medical Imaging
18 E. Laurel Road Stratford, NJ 08084
Stratford, NJ 08084
Appointments Only: 844-547-2255 General Questions: 856-346-7844

Directions
 

Outpatient Medical Imaging - Cherry Hill
2201 Chapel Avenue West
Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
Appointments Only: 844-547-2255 General Questions: 856-488-6844

Directions
 

Radiology - Medical Imaging
435 Hurffville-Cross Keys Road
Turnersville, NJ 08012
Appointments Only: 844-547-2255 General Questions: 856-582-2844

Directions

Outpatient Medical Imaging - Wash. Twp
900 Medical Center Drive
Sewell, NJ 08080
Appointments Only: 844-547-2255 General Questions: 856-582-2844

Directions


Kennedy's Medical Imaging services include:

DATSCAN

DaTscan™, the first FDA-approved radiopharmaceutical adjunct imaging agent to help physicians evaluate patients with suspected parkinsonian syndromes (PS), such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). DaTscan gives physicians adjunctive diagnostic capability that may help lead to timely and appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

Kennedy’s Medical Imaging Departments at its three hospital campuses are equipped to handle and dispense Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Schedule II radioactive drugs, such as DaTscan. For more information, call 856-582-2769 or 856-346-7999.

 

Nuclear Medicine

Involves the use of radioactive materials or isotopes to obtain specific diagnostic information. These isotopes transmit a pattern of X-rays representing the organ size, shape and function. The rays are detected by a special camera that, when coupled with a computer, produces an image on a screen.

Nuclear medicine involves the use of radioactive materials or isotopes to obtain specific diagnostic information. These isotopes transmit a pattern of X-rays representing the organ size, shape and function. The rays are detected by a special camera that, when coupled with a computer, produces an image on a screen. The isotope is administered intravenously, orally or by inhalation. Nuclear medicine is also used for treatment of certain conditions such as an overactive thyroid gland.

Many patients are concerned about having radioactive materials injected into them. Rest assured that Kennedy, like other nuclear medicine facilities, follows safe practices and only injects a safe and carefully measured amount of radiation.

Preparing for this test: Each nuclear medicine exam has required preparations. Your physician will provide information on what preparation is needed for the test you are having done. Tests can take 30 minutes to several hours, depending on the type.
 

MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or MRI, has greatly improved the accuracy of diagnostic imaging, particularly in structures such as the liver, brain and spinal cord. Patients are not exposed to X-rays with MRI testing; instead, images are created with the use of strong magnetic fields, radio waves and a sophisticated computer system.

Another revolution in Medical Imaging during the past 20 years is Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or MRI. MRI has greatly improved the accuracy of diagnostic imaging, particularly in structures such as the liver, brain and spinal cord.
A great advantage of MRI is that the patient is not exposed to X-rays. Instead, the images are created with the use of strong magnetic fields, radio waves and a sophisticated computer system. MRI allows the radiologist to see precise images of soft tissue structures and organs, including the brain, spinal cord, nerves, muscles, cartilage and ligaments. MRI is used to diagnose many conditions, including:

*
Tumors
*
Multiple Sclerosis
*
Infections of the brain, spine or joints
*
Tendonitis
*
Strokes in their earliest stages

MRI can also visualize:

*
Torn Ligaments
*
Shoulder injuries
*
Herniated discs

Preparing for this test: Unless you are told otherwise, take all of your regular medications and follow your normal diet. For some scans, you must wear a patient gown. Private dressing rooms are available. All removable metallic objects must be left outside the scanning room, including removable hearing aids, dentures and other prosthetic devices. Please tell your doctor and the MRI staff if you have any metal in your body that cannot be removed, including: pacemakers, implanted insulin pumps, aneurysm clips, vascular coils and filters, heart valves, ear implants, surgical staples and wires, shrapnel, bone or joint replacements, metal plates, rods, pins or screws, contraceptive diaphragms or coils, penile implants, and permanent dentures. In most cases, you can be scanned even though you have metal implants. Nevertheless, the radiologist and MRI staff must be aware of them. Also, tell a member of the staff if you are pregnant or if there is a possibility you are pregnant.

The Actual Test: An MRI is a comfortable and easy exam. You will be positioned on a table with the part of your body being scanned placed at the center of the tunnel-like portion of the machine. If you are claustrophobic, please discuss this with your doctor.  While the scan is in progress, you will hear a variety of pinging and thumping noises that stop and start at different times. The test can take anywhere from 30 to 90 minutes, depending on the number of images that need to be acquired.

For some tests, a special contrast material is injected into an arm vein when imaging certain parts of the body. MRI contrast, called Gadolinium, does not contain iodine and is different from x-ray dye. The contrast is safe and has very few, if any, side effects.
 

Ultrasound

Ultrasound uses reflected sound echoes to study and characterize internal structures and tissues. During pregnancy, a growing fetus can be imaged through ultrasound, without exposing the growing baby to ionizing radiation. Ultrasound is also an excellent tool for examining the heart because it is a "non-invasive" (i.e., not traumatic to the body) and can reveal more about heart function than conventional x-ray studies.
Ultrasound can also reveal information about the shape, texture, and composition of tumors and cysts. Kennedy's specialized equipment uses raw data digital processing throughout the entire ultrasound study - from the acquisition of raw data to digital viewing - and finally to the storage of data in its purest, digital form. Storing data in its original fidelity preserves image quality.
Ultrasound imaging, also called sonography, is a method of obtaining images from inside the human body through the use of high frequency sound waves. The reflected soundwave echoes are recorded and displayed as a real-time visual image. No ionizing radiation (X-ray) is involved in ultrasound imaging.

Obstetric ultrasound refers to the specialized use of sounds waves to visualize and thus determine the condition of a pregnant woman and her embryo or fetus. Ultrasound is a useful way examining many of the body's internal organs including the heart, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, and bladder.

Preparing for this test: Please wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing. Other preparation depends on the type of examination you are scheduled for. Your physician will instruct you in advance about any necessary preparation.

 

PET - CT Scan

Cancer cells grow at a very fast rate and growing cells use glucose (sugar) as a primary source of energy. The faster cells grow, the more glucose is consumed. Before a PET/CT study is done, a form of glucose called FDG, is injected into the patient's body via an IV. This FDG emits particles, called positrons. The FDG positrons are consumed more in fast growing cancer cells than in normal cells. A PET/CT scan detects where positrons are being emitted from within a patient's body and provides images that map these locations. A PET/CT scan will indentify both the presence of disease and its precise location in the body.
Cancer cells grow at a very fast rate and growing cells use glucose (sugar) as a primary source of energy. The faster cells grow, the more glucose is consumed.  Before a PET/CT study is done, a form of glucose called FDG, is injected into the patient's body via an IV. This FDG emits particles, called positrons. The FDG positrons are consumed more in fast growing cancer cells than in normal cells.  A PET/CT scan detects where positrons are being emitted from within a patient's body and provides images that map these locations.  A PET/CT scan will indentify both the presence of disease and its precise location in the body.

The day before your scan:

  • Eat a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet
  • Take prescribed medications unless advised otherwise
  • Avoid caffeine, sugar, tobacco and exercise for 24-hours prior to your diagnostic scan.

NOTE: If you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant, or have diabetes, be sure to tell your physician. People with diabetes will be given special instructions at the time their scan is scheduled. Generally, PET/CT is not performed on women who are pregnant.

The day of your scan:

  • Do not eat or drink anything except water for six hours before your test
  • Take any prescribed medication, unless instructed otherwise
  • Wear warm, comfortable clothes (the scanner room is kept cool). Avoid clothes with heavy buckles or metal components
  • Please arrive at least 15 minutes before your scheduled appointment
  • If you must cancel or reschedule, please do so at least 24 hours before your appointment
  • Expect to be at our PET/CT scan center for two to three hours.

What to bring with you:

  • Your insurance card and prescription
  • Films or digital images of previous CT scans, x-rays, and prior PET exams
  • Any pathology reports

Upon Arrival:

  • After registering, you will be taken to a preparation area, where a small amount of FDG (a form of glucose), will be injected through an IV
  • You will rest quietly for one hour while the FDG circulates throughout your body. During this time, you must avoid significant movement or talking. The waiting area will have a television set so you can relax during this time
  • Your scan will take between 30 to 60 minutes

After your scan:

  • You will be offered a snack and beverage
  • You can leave immediately
  • Your activity will not be restricted. You can drive and resume your normal diet, exercise and medication routine
  • You should drink plenty of fluids to flush the FDG from your body and avoid being around infants or anyone who is pregnant for the first eight hours immediately following your scan
  • Your physician will contact you with results of the PET/CT scan
 

Mammography

Mammography is the key to early diagnosis of breast cancer. Our mammography services are accredited by the American College of Radiology, which establishes national standards of excellence for both equipment and training of technologists and medical staff.

Each Kennedy outpatient mammography suite features state-of-the-art equipment designed "by women for women" to maximize patient comfort while offering superior diagnostic images.
 

Interventional Radiology

Used to treat a variety of medical conditions, Interventional Radiology involves X-rays and other imaging techniques to view inside the body while specially-trained physicians guide narrow tubes (catheters) and other very small instruments through the blood vessels and other pathways of the body to the site of a problem. The procedures are usually simpler and safer, less traumatic, less painful, and equally effective as comparable surgical procedures.

Sometimes called the surgery of the 21st Century,Interventional Radiology is used to treat a variety of medical conditions. Interventional radiologists are specially-trained doctors who use X-rays and other imaging techniques to view inside the body while they guide narrow tubes (catheters) and other very small instruments through the blood vessels and other pathways of the body to the site of a problem. The procedures are usually simpler and safer, less traumatic, less painful, and equally effective as comparable surgical procedures.

Types of procedures performed include:
  • angiography - an x-ray of the arteries and veins to detect and often treat blockage or narrowing of the vessels.
  • angioplasty - the use of a small balloon on the tip of a catheter inserted into a blood vessel to open up an area of blockage inside the vessel.
  • embolization - the insertion of a substance through a catheter into a blood vessel to stop hemorrhaging, or excessive bleeding.
  • gastrostomy tubes - a gastrostomy tube (feeding tube) is inserted into the stomach if the patient is unable to take food by mouth.
  • intravascular ultrasound - the use of ultrasound inside a blood vessel to better visualize the interior of the vessel in order to detect problems there.
  • stent placement - a tiny, expandable coil, called a stent, is placed inside a blood vessel at the site of a blockage. The stent is expanded to open up the blockage.
  • needle biopsy - a small needle is inserted into the abnormal area in almost any part of the body, guided by imaging techniques, to obtain a tissue biopsy.

Preparing for this test: Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the day prior to your procedure. This is so that we can give you sedation medicine as needed. You should take your regular medications and may take small sips of water to wash them down. If you have an allergy to radiographic contrast (x-ray dye), arrangement must be made for special medicine prior to the procedure.
 

Fluoroscopy

An X-ray exam that allows radiologists to use a real time imaging techniques. Unlike traditional X-ray, which produces still pictures, fluoroscopy can capture full motion.  It is often used to examine the entire gastrointestinal tract, specifically to pinpoint blockages or other abnormalities.

Fluoroscopy is a type of X-ray exam that allows radiologists to use "real-time" imaging techniques. Unlike traditional X-ray, which produces still pictures, fluoroscopy can capture full motion. For example, the esophagus can be visualized during swallowing under fluoroscopy. Common fluoroscopic tests include Upper GI and Barrium Enema.

This technique is often used to examine the entire gastrointestinal tract, specifically to pinpoint blockages or other abnormalities. Contrast agents such as barium and air can be used to increase visibility by lining the organs. The contrast is usually swallowed or introduced with an enema.

Preparing for this test: Fluoroscopic exams which generally take between 30 minutes to an hour -- require a certain amount of preparation. You will most likely be asked not to eat or drink anything between midnight and the appointment time. Tests involving a barium enema may require you to avoid solid foods for a day prior to the exam. A diet of clear liquids is usually required for at least 12-48 hours. A mild laxative may also be needed to clear the colon before the procedure.
 

Dexascan Testing - Bone Density Scan

Nearly 28 million Americans have--or are at risk for osteoporosis.  This disease occurs when bone density decreases, leading to fragile bones and an increased risk of fracture.  The DEXA Scan can precisely determine the level of bone density at the target areas and allow physicians to recommend treatments early.

Osteoporosis is responsible for 1.5 million fractures in the United States each year, and half of women over 50 can expect to suffer a fracture in their lifetime. Bone densitometry (Dexascan) examinations measure the mineral content of the bone. A dual energy beam of very low dose x-rays passes through the area being examined. The detectors then compare the amount of x-rays absorbed by the bone to the amount absorbed by the non-bony tissues of the body. Dexascan provides a measurement of the bone mineral density so your physician can determine if you have osteoporosis. If you are already being treated for osteoporosis, a Dexascan can monitor the effects of therapy.

How to prepare for this test: You should not have a barium study, radioisotope injection, oral or intravenous contrast material from a CT scan or MRI within seven days of your Dexascan. Avoid taking calcium supplements for at least 24 hours prior to your appointment. Wear loose, comfortable clothing.
 

CT Scan

Computed Tomography, or CT scanning, uses a computer to organize and stack information from multiple x-rays or cross-sectional "slices" of a body's organ or area. The scans are made by having the sources of an x-ray beam rotate around the patient. X-rays passing through the body are detected by sensors that pass the information to computers. Once processed, the information is displayed as an image on a video screen. The diagnostic tool of choice in a wide variety of situations the CT Scan--can replace more painful examinations, and even exploratory surgery in some cases. Our CT services are accredited by the American College of Radiology, which establishes national standards of excellence for both equipment and training of technologists and medical staff.

Computed Tomography Scan (CT-Scan) revolutionized Medical Imaging when it became widely available in the 1970s. CT uses X-rays to create images of the body. However, a radiograph (X-ray) and a CAT-scan work in different ways. An X-ray is a two-dimensional picture and a CAT-scan is three-dimensional. By imaging and looking at several three-dimensional "slices" of a body (like slices of bread) a doctor can tell, for example, not only if a tumor is present, but about how deep it is in the body. The newer spiral (also called helical) CT scan takes continuous pictures of the body in a spiral motion, so there are no gaps in the pictures collected.

CT imaging is particularly useful because it can show several types of tissues -- lung, bone, soft tissue, and blood vessels -- with great clarity. Using specialized equipment and expertise to create and interpret CT scans of the body, radiologists can easily diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, trauma, and musculoskeletal disorders.

Preparing for this test: For some studies, you may not eat solid food for four hours prior to your CT appointment. You may, however, have clear liquids (black coffee/tea, broth, clear soups, or juice) during this time in moderate amounts. Some patients will be asked to arrive one hour ahead of time so that a barium mixture they drink will reach and outline the gastrointestinal tract. Some CT scans do not require special preparation - be sure to check with your doctor or the Medical Imaging staff regarding your test. From start to finish, the picture-taking part of the test usually lasts only 10 to 15 minutes.
 

Diagnostic Radiology - X-Ray

Kennedy offers a wide range of general diagnostic studies such as chest x-rays, orthopedic imaging, and digital fluoroscopy.  Our state-of-the-art equipment insures the most detailed and accurate imaging available.

X-ray, or Radiography, involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of radiation to produce an image of internal organs. An X-ray machine is essentially a camera that uses radiation instead of visible light to expose the film.
You cannot feel, taste or see the X-rays as they pass through the body. The average exam takes no more than 10-15 minutes per part (i.e. chest, knee, spine). The final product is stored on a piece of film, the radiograph. These radiographs are read by the radiologist, a specially-trained physician.

About half of all X-rays are of the chest. A chest X-ray is usually done to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall. Pneumonia, heart failure, lung cancer and other medical conditions can be diagnosed or suspected on a chest X-ray.

Preparing for this test: This painless procedure requires no special preparation, but women should always inform their doctor or X-ray technologists if there is any chance they might be pregnant.