• Women's and Children's Services
Women's and Children's Services

For South Jersey Women, A Name You Can Count on. 

At Kennedy Health, caring for your family begins at birth, and we are dedicated to making your birthing experience as safe and memorable as possible.  We know that you’ll need experienced staff, comprehensive facilities, expert services and the personal care that is so important during the experience of a lifetime.  For 50 years, Kennedy Health has been providing all this and more as a key birthing center in southern NJ.
  • Board certified physicians. An experienced, dedicated staff including, perinatologists who specialize in high-risk pregnancies.
  • Sophisticated OB/GYN services including comprehensive ultrasound and robotic gynecological surgery
  • Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) providing advanced care for premature babies as young as 28 weeks old, seven-days-a-week, 24 hours a day
  • Maternal Fetal Medicine Unit offering special testing and care for high-risk patients
  • Highly trained midwives offering a unique birthing experience and gynecological services
  • Comprehensive pediatric care for infants, children and adolescents.

If you are an expectant mother about to embark on the exciting journey of motherhood, already have children, or are facing women’s health concerns, Kennedy Health is dedicated to providing the very best in comprehensive and coordinated health care services for women and their families.

Please choose from the following services:    

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As an expectant parent, you deserve the safest, most comfortable birth possible. Whether this is your first baby or a new addition to your growing family, our experienced team of medical experts are committed to providing you and your family with a beautiful and healthy birth experience. 

Midwife Services

Nurse Midwives offer a special approach to pregnancy and childbirth, with an emphasis on empowering women, providing highly personalized services and keeping a focus on the patient’s family throughout their care. They strive to help women achieve a safe, personalized and fulfilling birth experience. 

When you choose to deliver your baby with a Nurse Midwife, you and your family can expect the emotional and physical support every new mother needs. More importantly, you can rest easy knowing that you have a talented medical professional by your side that will always have your best interests at heart.

Labor and Delivery

At Kennedy, we’re eagerly awaiting your arrival. Our Labor and Delivery department is fully equipped with industry-leading technology and a  staff ready to make your birthing experience a joyous and healthy one. From our highly trained obstetrics team to our comfortable environment, we’re here to help you prepare conveniently and close to home. 

Maternal Fetal Medicine

General obstetricians have the expertise to care for most pregnancies, but high-risk pregnancy and/or birth can be more complicated. A pregnancy is considered high-risk when there are potential complications that could affect the mother, the baby or both. New Born

Neo Natal Intensive Care Unit

Kennedy's NICU (Neo-natal Intensive Care Unit) helps mothers and new-borns overcome special circumstances and complications surrounding the birthing process. Offering specialized technology and round-the-clock neonatology services for our smallest patients, our experienced team can help ensure a healthy outcome for you and your baby. 

OB/GYN Services

Kennedy OB/GYN Associates is dedicated to providing compassionate, patient-centric OB/GYN services for women of all ages in a comfortable environment. Our experienced team of physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners and support staff are here to provide excellent health care through every state of a woman’s life. With facilities for fetal monitoring during pregnancy, high-risk OB-neonatal care, laparoscopy, radiation therapy for gynecological cancers, and prenatal testing, the Kennedy OB/GYN team possesses the top talent and resources . 

If you have any questions regarding our programs or services, please contact us:

     Women's and Children's Services
     435 Hurffville Cross - Keys Road
     Turnersville, NJ 08012

Educational and Support Programs

We are committed to making our hospital the best birthing center NJ has to offer. One of the ways we accomplish this is by providing a wide range of quality educational programsto help you prepare for your upcoming delivery. We believe that, through education, your birthing experience can be enhanced and made more joyous and memorable. Listed in this catalogue are classes and programs available to you throughout your pregnancy and after your baby’s birth.

Pre-registration for classes is required. Class size is limited, so early registration is encouraged. Classes are subject to change or cancellation based on enrolment response. Kennedy Health System associates are eligible for discounted prices.

Click here to view a full listing of our educational programs.

Click here to view a full listing of our family support groups.

Kennedy’ Health’s  Women’s and Children’s Department encompasses a comprehensive range of programs and services, all specially designed to assist women and children as they move through the many diverse stages of life. Whether you are looking for an OB/GYN or a comprehensive birthing center, our holistic approach to women’s health means you can rest easy, knowing the coordinated care you expect is close to home and always available.

Frequently Asked Questions About Delivering Your Baby at Kennedy

How many people can I have with me for my delivery?

You may have 3 people with you to assist you in labor and observe the birth of your baby. These people will be banded during your labor and will have 24 hour visiting privileges. These bands are non transferable. Once you deliver, you select one person to be your primary support person. That person retains their band and has 24 hour visiting privileges. All other visitors must adhere to visiting hours.

What do I do if I think I am in labor?

Call your physician. If your water has broken he will direct you to come to the hospital. If you are contracting he may want to see you in his office or direct you to the hospital. If you are too uncomfortable, feel rectal pressure or are bleeding come directly to the hospital.

Where do I go once I arrive at the hospital?

If it is between the hours of 6am and 8pm come in through the front lobby and go directly to Labor and Delivery. If it is after 8pm and before 6am you must enter through the Emergency Room. They will escort you to Labor and Delivery.

What do I have to bring for my baby's hospital stay?

Everything your new baby needs is provided by the hospital. On the day of discharge you will need to bring your infant car seat and an outfit to take your baby home. Just before you leave we will take your baby's photograph. Photographs are mailed directly to your home.

What are the visiting hours?

All visitors may visit from 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m.

Can my baby stay with me in my room?

You will have one nurse who provides nursing care for you and your baby. This approach to nursing ensures consistency of care and improved communication. All new mothers have the option to have their baby "room in" around the clock. This helps moms to learn "the basics" of baby care as well before you take your baby home.

Do moms have private rooms?

All Labor & Delivery and Mother/Baby rooms are private.

Is a Pediatrician present for the birth?

A pediatrician is present in the event of a Cesarean Section. Also other situations may occur that initiate a request from the obstetrician that a Pediatrician be present at a vaginal delivery. Some of these are, a premature infant, an infant with a known birth defect or medical complication, or fetal distress in labor. If there are no complications in labor and during delivery, the pediatrician will not routinely attend. There is, however 24 hour in-house neonatology coverage (newborn specialists) in the event that the need arises.

How do I obtain a Birth Certificate for my child?

During your hospital stay you will be completing paperwork to initiate the process of obtaining your baby's State issued Birth Certificate. The following information is provided to assist you in the process should you have certain circumstances that require obtaining prior legal documents or signatures of other parties. These guidelines are created by the State of New Jersey and Kennedy Health System is obligated to comply with them.

Parents Who Are Married and the Husband Is the Biological Father
Parents will complete the birth certificate information, assure accuracy and sign the back.

Parents Who Want To Give The Baby Two Last Names
If parents want to give the baby two last names, such as "Cooper-Smith", the baby's legal last name will be both names if the name is hyphenated. If the name is not hyphenated and has only a space between the two names, such as "Cooper Smith", the legal last name will be Smith.
If the baby is named a Junior, such as John Doe, Jr., and the father wants to now become a Sr., he may do so if he wishes. There are no name changes involved, he may start signing Sr.

Mothers Who Are Married and the Husband Is Not the Biological Father
To prevent the husband's name from appearing on the birth certificate and to add the biological father's name to the birth certificate, both the Affidavit of Denial of Paternity and the Certificate of Parentage forms must be completed.

  • The husband and the mother must complete an Affidavit of Denial of Paternity in order to keep the husbands name off the child's birth certificate.
  • The mother and the biological father must complete the Certificate of Parentage form to place the biological father's name on the birth certificate. The father must show ID.
  • If the Affidavit of Denial of Paternity is not completed, the husband's name must be placed on the birth certificate.
    • If the forms are not completed, the mother may give her child any last name that she desires. It is important to include the name she desires at the time of birth registration as it is extremely difficult and costly to change the child's last name at a later date.

Mothers Who Are Divorced
In order to include the biological father's name on the birth certificate, mothers must be divorced 300 days or more prior to the baby's birth. If not, the mother may provide a copy of the divorce papers as long as they state that the ex-husband is not legally responsible for the baby she was carrying. If the papers do not state this the ex-husband and mother must sign an Affidavit of Denial of Paternity to prevent his name from appearing on the birth certificate. The biological father and mother must sign the Certificate of Parentage. The father must show ID.

Parents Who Are Not Married
In order to put the father's name on the Birth Certificate, the State requires both parents acknowledge paternity by signing the Birth Certificate and the Certificate of Parentage. By signing the Certificate of Parentage, both parents are legally responsible for their baby. The Certificate of Parentage can be rescinded/give up legal rights at any time within 60 days of the date signed. Both parents must agree to rescind by filing a Rescission of Certificate of Parentage with the Bureau of Vital Statistics.

Parents Who Want To give Their Baby a Different Last Name
Parents can give their baby any name they want as long as they both agree and sign the back of the Birth Certificate.

Mothers offering their baby's for adoption have the option of filling out the Birth Certificate worksheet. The mother can name the baby any name she chooses.

Same Sex Parents
The Parents must present a NJ Superior Court Order that states both same sex parents are to be named on the Birth Certificate. The Court Order must be issued before or up to the day of birth.

Forms Provided by the Hospital

  • Affidavit of Denial of Paternity
  • Certificate of Parentage
  • Rescission of Certificate of Parentage
  • Social Security Packets (for Parents who wish not to apply for a Social Security number for the baby through the hospital)

What is Post Partum Depression?

After the excitement over your baby’s arrival subsides, the reality of caring for a newborn sets it.  Some moms experience a letdown caused by their new responsibilities, loss of freedom, exhaustion and lack of sleep.  New moms can feel they have no time to meet their own personal needs.


Many mothers go through these “baby blues” a few days after birth.  Feelings of sadness or anxiety are often accompanied by mood swings, irritability, crying and confusion.  These feelings usually peak 4 to 6 days after delivery.  They begin to decrease and are usually gone two weeks after the baby’s birth.  Support from family and friends, adequate sleep and nutrition help new moms weather this storm.


The National Women’s Health Information Center offers these helpful tips:


  • Don’t worry about doing everything perfectly.  Do the best you can
  • Ask for help from your spouse or partner, family or friends
  • Sleep as much as possible.  Take advantage of baby’s naps to catch up.
  • Talk about your feelings with family, friends and other new moms
  • Join a support group for new mothers
  • Keep life as simple as possible after the baby is born


If these feelings persist, they may be signs of postpartum depression.  Warning signs differ and may appear days, weeks or even months after a pregnancy, miscarriage or birth.  They may include:


  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Eating much more or less than normal
  • Feeling irritable, angry, nervous or exhausted
  • Lack of interest in the baby, family or friends
  • Low or no sex drive
  • Feeling guilty, worthless or hopeless
  • Feelings of being a “bad” mother
  • Low energy, difficulty making decisions or trouble concentrating
  • Thoughts of harming baby, yourself or others



Kennedy is affiliated with the Southern New Jersey Perinatal Cooperative’s Regional Postpartum Depression Support Service.  For more information, call 856-665-6000, ext 262. A support service professional will contact you during regular business hours with further information about resources.


For emergencies, please call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room for help.