Hospital:

ER Wait Times

ER Wait Times

Jefferson Cherry Hill Hospital

Jefferson Stratford Hospital

21 min.

Jefferson Washington Township Hospital

7 min.

Bariatric Surgery Options

Sleeve Gastrectomy

Sleeve gastrectomy is a more recent option for bariatric surgery. Often called Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG) or Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG), this procedure involves removing a portion of your stomach in order to restrict the amount of food you can eat and make you feel less hungry.

How It Works

With sleeve gastrectomy, your bariatric surgeon will remove the left side of your stomach (called the greater curvature), decreasing your stomach's overall size. This also involves the removal of your stomach's fundus, which is responsible for secreting the "hunger hormone" (called ghrelin). So, you feel fuller both because your stomach is smaller and because of hormonal changes.

Sleeve gastrectomy can be used in 1 of 2 ways:

  • 1-stage surgery: For many patients, sleeve gastrectomy itself can be an appropriate weight-loss option.
  • 2-stage surgery: Sleeve gastrectomy can help some high-risk patients, such as those with a body mass index (BMI) above 60, prepare for a more permanent gastric bypass surgery that would otherwise be too risky. Undergoing the sleeve gastrectomy first can help the patient lose a significant amount of weight. At this point, gastric bypass may be a safe option for a more permanent weight-loss solution.

Benefits 

  • Makes your stomach smaller, limiting the amount of food you can eat.
  • May make you feel less hungry.
  • Minimally invasive option that may result in less discomfort and a faster recovery.
  • A simpler operation than other options, which doesn't require disconnecting or reconnecting your intestines.
  • Less chance of nutrition problems than with gastric bypass surgery.
  • May be safer than other options according to some data.
  • Can be used as the first part of a 2-stage surgery.

Potential Risks

  • Injury to your stomach, intestines or other organs.
  • Leaking from stapled areas of your stomach, which may require emergency surgery.
  • Scarring in your stomach, which can lead to bowel obstruction.
  • Stomach inflammation, heartburn or ulcers.
  • Poor nutrition.

Things to Consider

  • This is a newer procedure than other options, so, there's not as much data on the long-term benefits and risks.
  • You may lose weight at a slower pace and/or lose less weight overall than you would with gastric bypass surgery.
  • You will need to diet and exercise after surgery in order to avoid complications and reach your ideal weight.
  • With a smaller stomach, you may experience vomiting if you eat more food than your stomach pouch can hold.

For more information on bariatric surgery options and services at Jefferson Health New Jersey, please call 856-346-6470.

Gastric Bypass

The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the best-known and most common type of weight-loss surgery. It has been proven highly effective in helping patients lose a significant amount of weight—and maintain their weight loss over the long-term. The Jefferson Bariatric Surgery Program in New Jersey offers a laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery procedure, which may result in less discomfort and a faster recovery.

How It Works

With gastric bypass surgery, your bariatric surgeon will change the way food moves through your stomach and small intestine. This surgery gets its name from causing the food you eat to literally "bypass" part of your stomach and small intestine, allowing your body to absorb fewer calories.

Gastric bypass is a 2-step surgical procedure:

  • Making your stomach smaller: First, your surgeon will make your stomach smaller by segmenting it, creating a small pouch in the top part of your stomach. After surgery, the food you eat will go into this pouch. Because the pouch is designed to hold only 1 ounce of food at a time, this restricts the amount of food you can eat in one sitting.
  • Bypassing parts of your stomach and lower intestine: Next, your surgeon will reattach this pouch to a point further along your small intestine than normal. This is what allows your food to bypass your lower stomach and upper small intestine, preventing your body from absorbing as many calories.

Benefits

  • Makes your stomach smaller, reducing the amount of food you can eat at one time, while still making you feel full (called restriction).
  • Reduces your body's ability to absorb calories from the foods you eat (called malabsorption).
  • Proven to help patients lose up to 80% of their excess body weight when followed by complete adherence to post-surgery diet and lifestyle changes.
  • Proven to help patients maintain weight loss for up to 15 years when paired with continued adherence to post-surgery diet.
  • Can be performed through minimally invasive laparoscopy in patients, resulting in less discomfort and a shorter recovery time.

Potential Risks

  • Injury to your stomach, intestines or other organs.
  • Incisional hernia (more common with conventional surgery).
  • Leaking from stapled areas of your stomach, which may require emergency surgery.
  • Deficiencies resulting from an inability to absorb important nutrients (called malabsorption).
  • Adverse reactions to refined sugars, high-fat foods, and simple carbohydrates (called dumping syndrome).
  • Gallstones, gallbladder attacks.
  • Breakdown of the stomach pouch or narrowing of the opening between the pouch and small intestine, which may require a 2nd operation.
  • Stomach inflammation, heartburn or ulcers.

Things to Consider

  • You will need to follow strict dietary and lifestyle changes to avoid complications and reach your ideal weight.
  • With a smaller stomach, you may experience vomiting if you eat more food than your stomach pouch can hold.

For more information on bariatric surgery options and services at Jefferson Health New Jersey, please call 856-346-6470.

Adjustable Gastric Banding

Adjustable gastric banding uses an adjustable band to make your stomach smaller. This limits how much food you can eat at once, thereby helping you to lose weight and feel fuller longer. Also called laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, or LAP-BAND® surgery, this procedure has been approved by the FDA since 2001.

How It Works

With adjustable gastric banding, your stomach will be made smaller, controlling how quickly food moves through. First, your surgeon will place a bracelet-like band around the upper part of your stomach, creating a small pouch at the top of your stomach where food will go. Since this pouch can only hold a small amount of food, you will not be able to eat as much.

A circular balloon inside the band will control the outlet (called the "stoma") between the small food pouch and the lower part of your stomach. The size of this outlet regulates how food flows from the pouch to your lower stomach. Making the outlet smaller will help you to feel fuller sooner and for a longer period of time.

Your surgeon will connect the gastric band to an access port beneath your skin. This will allow your surgeon to adjust the size of your stoma over time by inflating or deflating the balloon. With these adjustments, your surgeon can help you to stay on track with your weight loss goals while meeting your ongoing nutritional needs.

Benefits

  • Performed through minimally invasive laparoscopy, resulting in less discomfort and a shorter recovery time.
  • Does not require your bowel to be cut or stapled or your intestines re-routed like traditional gastric bypass surgery.
  • May be an option even if you have pre-existing medical conditions.

Potential Risks

  • Your body may not tolerate food—especially meat—as well as it did.
  • Injury to your stomach, intestines or other organs.
  • Scarring in your stomach, which can lead to bowel obstruction.
  • Stomach inflammation, heartburn or ulcers.
  • Poor nutrition.
  • Possibility of gastric band slipping partially out of place.
  • Possibility that your surgeon won't be able to reach the access port to adjust the band, requiring another minor operation.

Things to Consider

  • You may lose weight at a slower pace and/or lose less weight overall than you would with gastric bypass surgery.
  • You will need to diet and exercise after surgery in order to avoid complications and reach your ideal weight.
  • With a smaller stomach, you may experience vomiting if you eat more food than your stomach pouch can hold.

For more information on bariatric surgery options and services at Jefferson Health New Jersey, please call 856-346-6470.